Steven R. Wininger, Ph. D.
 
Vita


 

PSY 617 READING AND UNDERSTANDING STATISTICS IN PSYCHOLOGY
Course Materials

Syllabus

Section Feedback Questions

Effect size conversion handout
Converting different effect sizes link

Nonparametric Presentation Directions

Topical course outline with a tentative schedule and assigned readings
*Articles that require the a, and b responses.

Learning Objective

Chapter in Book

Articles/Handouts

Section I

Preliminaries

What is the typical format of a journal article?

 

1

Hudson-Barr, 2004

What are some essential questions to ask about every article you read?

Essential Questions Handout
Wilkinson, 1999
Appelbaum, 2018

Can you accurately evaluate the quality of the research methodology (brief review)?

What are the strengths and weaknesses of descriptive, correlational, and experimental research?

 

 

 

Methods & Threats to Validity Handout

What are the most common threats to the external and internal validity of the research?

 

What are some common means for controlling threats to validity of research?

 

Do the variables assessed in the study reflect adequate psychometric properties?

Reliability: sub types and acceptable levels.

4

 

Validity: sub types and acceptable levels.

 

What do you know about moderating and mediating variables (round 1)?

 

What is the difference between a moderating vs. mediating variable?

 

 

 

*MacKinnon, 2011

Can you provide examples of each?

 

Why should they be included in a study (reasons from MacKinnon)?

 

Section II

Can you accurately interpret common descriptive statistics and graphical means of reporting data?

What are the different scales of measurement and how do they impact selection of stats?

 

2

 

What are the different measures of central tendency, variability, and distributional shape? When do you use each one and how do you interpret them?

Havjovsky, 2017

How do you interpret frequency distributions?

 

How do you interpret a histogram?

Watkins, 2015

How do you interpret box plots?

How do you interpret standard Scores (z & t)?

 

How do you interpret the standard normal distribution and how does it relate to probability?

 

Null hypothesis significance testing

What is the purpose of null hypothesis significance testing?

 

7

 

How do you interpret NHST results?

 

What are the alpha, beta, type I errors (round I), and type II errors?

 

What are outliers? How do you detect them? What do you do with them?

 

*Field partial chapter

 

What are common assumptions for parametric statistics?

 

Explain the concept of robustness and how it relates to the Central Limit Theorem.

*Glass partial chapter

Confidence Intervals

What is sampling error?

 

6

 

What is standard error?

 

How do you create a confidence interval?

 

How do you interpret a CI?

Jepson, 2006
Renshaw, 2016

Effect Sizes

What is the difference between statistical vs. practical significance?

 

 

 

8

 

 

*Ferguson, 2009

Why are effect sizes important?

What are the different “families” of effect sizes?

How do you interpret different types of effect sizes (i.e. criteria for magnitude labels)?

How do you calculate effect sizes if the article does not provide them?

Effect size conversion handout
Converting different effect sizes link

Power

What is statistical power?

 

8

 

*Ellis, 2012

Why is statistical power important?

How do you calculate statistical power? Relate statistical power to type I and type II error rates.

Type I error rates (round 2)

What is meant by “inflated type I error risk?”

 

8

 

How do you control for inflated type I error risk?

 

Section III

Parametric stats

  • determine the appropriateness of each statistic utilized given the research design and variables.
  • determine if the assumptions for the statistic utilized were met.
  • accurately interpret the statistical significance.
  • accurately interpret and if necessary compute the practical significance (i.e., effect size).
  • translate statistical results into applied implications.

Mean Differences

z-test

10

Ain, 2016

t-test for one sample

10

Cottrell, 2015

t-test for two independent samples

10

Bude, 2012

t-test for related scores

10

Segers, 2009

1 factor ANOVA

11

January, 2012

Post HOC &planned comparisons

12

Tuominen, 2008
MacQuarrie, 2002

2 factor between groups ANOVA

13

Castro, 2014

Moderation (round 2)

 

 

1 factor within groups ANOVA

14

Rotgans, 2011
Christ, 2007

Mixed factorial ANOVA

14

Iordanou, 2014
Schulte, 2001

ANCOVA

15

Kant, 2017
Rogers, 2009

MANOVA

19

Hallberg, 2017
McGrath, 2005

Section IV

Correlation

Simple correlation

3 & 9

Lewis, 2017
McCormick, 2017
Arroyos, 2000

Comparison of two correlation coefficients

9

Hosterman, 2008

Partial correlation

*Field, 2013 excerpt

 

Wei, 2011
Andersson, 2008

Mediation (round 2)

*Jose, 2013 excerpt

 

Regression

16

Simone, 2018

Multiple regression (MR)

16

Gorman, 2002

Simultaneous MR

16

 

Stepwise MR

16

Gutkin, 1984

Hierarchical MR

16

Mayer, 2014
Kozan, 2016

Moderation & mediation (round 3)

 

 

Curvilinear regression

 

Karabenick, 1988
Marsh, 2000

Logistic regression

16

Blake, 2017
Martin, 2014

Path analyses

 

Assor, 2005
Braten, 2014

Structural equation modeling

21

Keller, 2014
Rudasill, 2013

Hierarchical linear modeling

*Tabachnick, Ch. 15, 2013

Cameron, 2008
Kunter, 2007

Canonical correlation

*Tabachnick, Ch. 12, 2013

Wanders, 2007
Cano, 2009

Discriminant analyses

*Tabachnick, Ch. 9, 2013

Ilmer, 1988
Hess, 2001

Section V

Nonparametric stats

17 & 18

 

Chi-squared

17

Balazs, 2018

Student nonparametric stats presentations

 

 

 

 

 

Websites of Interest