Alfred Russel Wallace : Alfred Wallace : A. R. Wallace :
Russel Wallace : Alfred Russell Wallace (sic)

 
 
A Sitting With Dr. Slade (S255: 1876)

 
Editor Charles H. Smith's Note: A letter to the Editor printed on page 42 of the 25 August 1876 issue of The Spiritualist (London). To link directly to this page, connect with: http://people.wku.edu/charles.smith/wallace/S255.htm


    My séance with Dr. Slade, on August 9th, was very similar in its details to that so admirably and fully described by Serjeant Cox, in the pages of The Spiritualist. Little is needed, therefore, but for me to confirm the accuracy of that description.

    Writing came upon the upper part of the slate, when I myself held it pressed close up to the under-side of the table, both Dr. Slade's hands being upon the table in contact with my other hand. The writing was audible while in progress. This one phenomenon is absolutely conclusive. It admits of no explanation or imitation by conjuring.

    Writing also came on the under-side of the slate while laid flat upon the table, Dr. Slade's hand being laid flat on it, immediately under my eyes.

    A chair was moved, and held for several seconds with the seat up to the table at the furthest corner from Dr. Slade, while both his hands were clasped on mine, and his body was quiescent.

    I was repeatedly touched and my clothes pulled on the side turned away from Dr. Slade; my chair was rapped on the back, and sharp taps came under the cane seat of my chair.

    While Dr. Slade was holding the slate in one hand, the other being clasped on mine, a distinct hand rose rapidly up and down between the table and my body; and, finally, while Dr. Slade's hands and mine were both on the centre of the table, the further side rose up till it was nearly vertical, when the whole table rose and turned over on to my head.

    These phenomena occurred in broad daylight, with the sun shining into the room, and with no one present but Dr. Slade and myself. They may be witnessed with slight variations by any of our men of science, and it is to be hoped that those who do not take the trouble to see them will, at all events, cease to speak disparagingly of the intellectual and perceptive powers of those who, having seen, declare them to be realities.

    It is also not too much to ask that men who have previously denied the possibility of such phenomena, and have accused others of prepossession and self-delusion, should, after having seen Dr. Slade, make some public acknowledgment of their error.


*                 *                 *                 *                 *

Return to Home