728:  Mathematics General Option

Approved Ogden College Supporting Courses


Agriculture

AGEC 360 – AGRICULTURAL ECONOMICS.  (3 semester hours)
An introduction to the private and public sector of the United States economy.  Identification of the resources used in agriculture.  Elementary application of economic principles to resource use in agriculture.

AGEC 365 – COMPUTER APPLICATIONS IN AGRICULTURE.  (2 semester hours)
Prerequisite:  CSCI 145C or permission of the instructor.
Instruction in the use of microcomputers in agriculture. Included will be word processing, spreadsheets, data files, presentations, and other software used in agriculture.

Note:  AGEC (Agricultural Economics) courses higher than 360 are also acceptable.

AGRI 291 – INTRODUCTION TO DATA ANALYSIS AND INTERPRETATION.  (3 semester hours)
Prerequisites:  Six hours of natural and/or social science and MATH 116.
Application of scientific method in acquiring new knowledge, interpretation of statistical research data; application of statistical concepts.  Lecture and laboratory.


Architectural and Manufacturing Science

AMS 261 – CONSTRUCTION METHODS AND MATERIALS.  (3 semester hours)
Survey of the basic methods and materials used for light commercial and residential construction applications. Addresses general requirements and site work, along with primary materials and techniques of regional construction practices.  Course Fee

AMS 262 – CONSTRUCTION LABORATORY.  (1 semester hour)
The laboratory to accompany AMS 261.  Hands-on experience with basic construction methods and materials used in light commercial and residential construction, including framing, concrete, masonry, and miscellaneous metals. Course Fee

AMS 263 – ARCHITECTURE DOCUMENTATION I.  (3 semester hours)
Prerequisites:  AMS 163 with a grade of C or higher;  AMS 261.
Planning and producing residential construction drawings. Residential construction standards and codes; building materials research and specification.  Course Fee

AMS 271 – INDUSTRIAL STATISTICS.  (3 semester hours)
Prerequisite:  MATH 116 or equivalent.
A study of statistical techniques typically used in industry for purposes of Statistical Process Control, material science research, and system planning and operation.  Course Fee

AMS 282 – ARCHITECTURAL STRUCTURES.  (3 semester hours)
Prerequisites:  AMS 261, MATH 117 (or equivalent), PHYS 201.
Survey of concepts, knowledge, and methods of statics and strength of materials with emphasis on factors that influence the development of architectural space and form. Includes qualitative and quantitative solution methods, focusing on application versus theoretical principles.  Course Fee

AMS 308 – GRAPHIC COMMUNICATION.  (3 semester hours)
Prerequisite:  AMS 163 or AMS 205 or JOUR 231.
Includes preparation of camera copy, line copy, photography, halftone photography, making color separations, and offset platemaking.  Students explore offset printing and photographic screen printing of half-tone images.

AMS 310 – WORK DESIGN/ERGONOMICS.  (3 semester hours)
Prerequisite:  MATH 116.
Design for people-machine interaction, including an introduction to the relevant underlying human sciences. Theory, data, and measurement problems in human information processing, training and industrial safety.  Course Fee

AMS 311 – DIGITAL SYSTEMS SIMULATION.  (3 semester hours)
Prerequisite:  AMS 271.
Analysis of systems using both analytic methods and computer simulation.  Empirical and theoretical models of arrival and service processes. State spaces and state transition probabilities. Simulation of queuing and manufacturing systems. Continuous time analysis of manufacturing systems.  Course Fee

AMS 325 – SURVEY OF BUILDING SYSTEMS.  (3 semester hours)
Prerequisites:  AMS 163, 261 and MATH 118 or equivalent.
A study of National Electric Code, BOCA National Building Code, Standard Building Code, Local Building Code, structural systems, egress system, residential and commercial wiring, blueprint reading, HVAC, and energy conservation techniques.  Course Fee

AMS 332 – SOLAR TECHNOLOGY APPLICATIONS.  (3 semester hours)
Prerequisite:  MATH 118 or MATH 117.
Practical applications of basic laws of physics governing behavior of mechanical and electrical components to convert solar energy to electricity.  Discussion of passive and active utilization of solar energy to provide domestic hot water and space heating. Solar geometry and system design with emphasis on efficiency.  Travel to WKU Center for Research and Development required.

AMS 355 – SYSTEMS DESIGN.  (3 semester hours)
Prerequisite:  MATH 116.
A comprehensive study of manufacturing organizations and their administration involving facilities layout, design of work systems, forecasting and decision making, planning for facilities and equipment.  (Note: This course is for the Technology Management major or non-AMS majors.)

AMS 356 – SYSTEMS DESIGN AND OPERATION.  (3 semester hours)
Prerequisites:  Junior standing, MATH 118 or 116 and 117, AMS 271.
A study of manufacturing organizations and their administration, facilities layout, work systems, forecasting and decision making. Applications of resource planning determining product demand, controlling inventory, goods and services.  Course Fee

AMS 371 – QUALITY ASSURANCE.  (3 semester hours)
Prerequisite:  MATH 183 or AMS 271.
A study of quality assurance techniques. Application of Statistical Process Control (SPC), acceptance sampling, military standards 105D & 414.  Quality organizations and standards.  Course Fee

CM 227 – APPLIED STATICS.  (3 semester hours)
Prerequisites:  MATH 122 and PHYS 201.
A branch of mechanics dealing with forces and the effects of forces acting on bodies at rest. Topics include: vector operations, applied loads, forces, moments of a force, couples, resultants, free-body diagrams, equilibrium, friction, centroids, centers of gravity and moments of inertia. Applications involve beams, frames, trusses, cables, pulleys, sheaves and machines.  (Does not count toward any engineering major).  Course Fee

CM 337 – APPLIED STRENGTH OF MATERIALS.  (3 semester hours)
Prerequisite:  CM 227 or permission of instructor.  Corequisite:  CM 339.
Basic design applications using primary building materials and concepts of stress, strain, and elastic deformation, including axial, torsional, shearing, flexural, and combined stresses, elongation, and deflection, shear and moment diagrams, column buckling, and material testing.  Course Fee

CM 339 –  APPLIED STRENGTH OF MATERIALS LAB.  (1 semester hour)
Corequisite:  CM 337.
Testing of metals and non-metals in support of material covered in CM 337.  Experiments: Rockwell Hardness, impact, tension, torsion, flexure, deflection, compression, column buckling, bolt shear, bearing on connections.

CM 361 – COMPUTER APPLICATIONS IN CONSTRUCTION MANAGEMENT.  (3 semester hours)
Prerequisite:  CE 360.
The utilization of modern construction management computer programs for estimating and scheduling the construction process. Topics include detailed estimating, quantity take-offs using a digitizing board, detailed scheduling and project control.

Astronomy

ASTR 214 – GENERAL ASTRONOMY.  (4 semester hours)
Corequisite:  MATH 136.
An introduction to astronomy for science majors. Topics include distances, masses, and luminosities of stars, stellar atmospheres and structure, stellar evolution, star systems, interstellar matter, galaxies, cosmology, the sun, and the solar system. Three hours of lecture and two hours of laboratory per week.  GEN ED D-I (DL) | NS | SL

Note: The above course is the highest in this discipline with a GEN ED designation.  It can count toward both Gen Ed and 728 supporting course requirements.

ASTR 414 – ASTROPHYSICS.  (4 semester hours)
Prerequisites:  PHYS 321 and MATH 237.  Corequisite:  MATH 331.
Introduction to current astrophysical topics, including radiation theory, the interstellar medium, stellar evolution, galaxies, quasars and cosmology.


Biology

BIOL 120 – BIOLOGICAL CONCEPTS: CELLS METABOLISM, GENETICS.  (3 semester hours)
Corequisite:  BIOL 121.
Introductory course in biology that emphasizes cellular organization and processes, metabolism, DNA structure and replication, and Mendelian and population genetics.  GEN ED D-I | NS

Note:  The above course does not count toward both GEN ED and 728 supporting course requirements.

BIOL 121 – BIOLOGICAL CONCEPTS: CELLS, METABOLISM, AND GENETICS LAB.  (1 semester hour)
Corequisite:  BIOL 120.
Introductory laboratory in biology that emphasizes the experimental aspects of cellular organization and processes, metabolism, DNA structure and replication, and Mendelian and population genetics. Course Fee  GEN ED D-I (DL) | SL
Note:  The above course does not count toward both GEN ED and 728 supporting course requirements.

BIOL 283 – INTRODUCTORY BIOSTATISTICS.  (4 semester hours)
Prerequisites:  BIOL 120-121 and BIOL 122-123;  MATH 118.
Introduction to statistical techniques and experimental design applied to the biological sciences. Probability and distributions, descriptive statistics, hypothesis testing and statistical inference using t-statistics, regression, ANOVA, chi-square, non-parametic tests.  Use of computers and analysis of real data are emphasized.

BIOL 312 – BIOINFORMATICS.  (4 semester hours)
Prerequisites:  BIOL 120-121 or 113, and BIOL 283 or MATH 183 or MATH 382 or STAT 301.
Presentation of the theoretical underpinnings and the computational methods of nucleic acid and protein sequence analyses used in genomic work.  An associated laboratory component will provide project-based application of these methods.

BIOL 483 – MULTIVARIATE METHODS IN BIOLOGY.  (4 semester hours)
Prerequisites:  Junior standing and a course in statistics, or permission of instructor.
Application of multivariate statistical analysis techniques to problems in the biological sciences.  Principal component and factor analysis, canonical discriminant analysis, correspondence analysis, distance metrics and clustering, canonical correlation, repetitive sampling, randomization.  Not a course in mathematical statistics; rather, emphasis is on experimental design, selection of appropriate methods for testing a particular hypothesis, and the analysis of real data.


Chemistry

CHEM 222 – COLLEGE CHEMISTRY II.  (3 semester hours)
Prerequisites:  CHEM 120-121 with a grade of “C” or better and MATH 118.  Corequisite:  CHEM 223.
A continuation of the first year course in chemistry for science majors and minors.  It is also satisfactory for general education requirements for non-science majors and minors.

CHEM 223 – COLLEGE CHEMISTRY II LABORATORY.  (2 semester hours)
Prerequisites:  CHEM 120-121 with a grade of “C” or better and MATH 118.  Corequisite:  CHEM 222.
Laboratory to accompany CHEM 222. A major portion of the course is devoted to semimicro qualitative inorganic analysis.  Pre-lab lecture and laboratory meet for four hours per week.  Course Fee

CHEM 314 – INTRODUCTORY ORGANIC CHEMISTRY.  (5 semester hours)
Prerequisites:  CHEM 222-223 or permission of instructor
A brief survey course primarily for various pre-professional and science area curricula requiring one semester of organic chemistry.  Course Fee

CHEM 330 – QUANTITATIVE ANALYSIS.  (5 semester hours)
Prerequisites:  CHEM 222-223 with a grade of “C” or better.
A study of the common techniques and theory of gravimetric, volumetric, electrochemical, and optical methods of analysis.  Lecture, 3 hours; laboratory 2 hours. Laboratory meets four and one-half hours per week.  Priority for registration for this course will be given to rising sophomores and rising juniors.   Course Fee

CHEM 340 – ORGANIC CHEMISTRY I.  (3 semester hours)
Prerequisites:  CHEM 222-223 with a grade of “C” or better.  Corequisite:  CHEM 341.
The first half of the standard one- year course for chemistry majors. Discussion includes various organic mechanisms and preparations. The entire sequence of CHEM 340-341, 342-343 should be completed. If only one semester of organic chemistry is desired, CHEM 314 should be taken.

CHEM 341 – ORGANIC CHEMISTRY LABORATORY I.  (2 semester hours)
Prerequisites:  CHEM 222-223 with a grade of “C” or better.  Corequisite:  CHEM 340.
Laboratory work includes studies of typical organic reactions and preparations.  Course Fee

CHEM 342 – ORGANIC CHEMISTRY II.  (3 semester hours)
Prerequisites:  CHEM 340-341 with a grade of “C” or better.  Corequisite:  CHEM 343.
A continuation of CHEM 340.

CHEM 343 – ORGANIC CHEMISTRY II LABORATORY.  (2 semester hours)
Prerequisites:  CHEM 340-341 with a grade of “C” or better.  Corequisite:  CHEM 342.
Includes studies of typical organic reactions and an introduction to qualitative organic analysis.  Course Fee

CHEM 412 – INTRODUCTION TO PHYSICAL CHEMISTRY.  (5 semester hours)
Prerequisites:  CHEM 330 and MATH 118.
A study of the chemical principles involved in thermodynamics, kinetics, equilibrium, surface phenomena, macromolecules, molecular structure and other selected topics using biological examples. The course is specifically for secondary education students and those students not qualifying for the CHEM 450-452 sequence. It is not acceptable for the ACS-program students.  Course Fee

Note:  All other chemistry courses beyond CHEM 412 are acceptable.


Civil Engineering

CE 160 – PRINCIPLES OF SURVEYING.  (3 semester hours)
Prerequisites:  High School Algebra & Trigonometry.  Corequisite:  CE 161.
A study of the basic principles of surveying. Topics include: field note-taking, taping distances, differential leveling, profile leveling, angular measurements, bearings and azimuths, EDM, traversing, topographic mapping, and construction stakeout. The use and care of surveying equipment includes: automatic levels, pocket transits, total stations, and data collectors.

CE 161 – PRINCIPLES OF SURVEYING LAB.  (1 semester hour)
Corequisite:  CE 160.
Field and office procedures in support of material studied in CE 160.

CE 310 – STRENGTH OF MATERIALS LABORATORY.  (1 semester hour)
Prerequisites:  MATH 137, and EM 221 or EM 222.  Corequisite:  EM 302 or EM 303.
Implementation of fundamental principles and physical laws governing the response of structural components to external forces. Students will plan, conduct and report on experiments to measure the performance characteristics of materials and structural systems.

CE 341 – UK-FLUID THERMAL SCIENCE.  (4 semester hours)
Prerequisites:  MATH 137, and EM 221 or EM 222, and major status in civil engineering.
Conservation of fluid mass and momentum, forces in fluids, pipe flow, fluid measurements, pump systems, hydrodynamic drag, open channel flow, and introduction to thermodynamics. Students may not earn credit for both CE 341 and CE 342.

CE 342 – WKU-FLUID THERMAL SCIENCE.  (4 semester hours)
Prerequisites:  MATH 137, and EM 221 or EM 222, and major status in civil engineering.
Conservation of fluid mass and momentum, forces in fluids, pipe flow, fluid measurements, pump systems, hydrodynamic drag, open channel flow, and introduction to thermodynamics. Students may not earn credit for both CE 341 and CE 342.

CE 461 – HYDROLOGY.  (3 semester hours)
Prerequisites:  MATH 331, STAT 301, CE 160, and CE 341 or 342.
A study of the laws governing the occurrence, distribution and movement of water and contaminant substances in watershed systems. Meteorological considerations, precipitation, evaporation, transpiration, infiltration, streamflow, hydrograph analysis, flood routing groundwater flow, and frequency analysis. Principles and mathematical models describing the propagation of contaminants in rivers, lakes, soils and groundwater.

CE 462 – HYDRAULIC ENGINEERING SYSTEMS.  (3 semester hours)
Prerequisites:  MATH 331 and CE 461.
Methods of analysis for hydrostatics, pipe flow, open channel flow including uniform and gradually varied flow, culvert and channel hydraulic design, dimensional analysis and channel modeling for flood mapping.


Computer Science

CS 225 – COMPUTER SCIENCE SYSTEMS HARDWARE AND SOFTWARE I.  (4 semester hours)
Prerequisites:  Grade of “C” or better in CS 180.
Introduction to computer architecture and organization, computer number representations, digital logic and circuitry, types of memory, CPU operations and basic assembly programming. A lab component applies systems hardware and software.

CS 239 – PROBLEM SOLVING WITH COMPUTATIONAL TECHNIQUES.  (3 semester hours)
Prerequisite:  MATH 117 with a grade of C or better or placement into a science calculus course.
Solving engineering problems using computational techniques. Topics include problem definition, algorithm development, flowcharting, input/output and structured programming.  (May count as 1.5 hours towards a major/minor in Computer Science.)

CS 270 – INTRODUCTION TO WEB PROGRAMMING.  (3 semester hours)
Prerequisites:  CS 146 or CS 170, or CS 180 with grades of C or better.
Introductory course in web programming and web application development. Provides students with essential skills for developing basic client- side and server-side applications. A survey course on the role of computing in society, designed primarily for computer science majors and minors. Discusses current topics related to the use of computing and associated trends.

CS 280 – COMPUTER SCIENCE III.  (3 semester hours)
Prerequisites:  A grade of “C” or better in CS 181, MATH 119, 122, or 136.
Finite and discrete algebraic structures, including Boolean algebras, directed and undirected graphs and the applications of these structures in computer science.

CS 371 – ADVANCED COMPUTATIONAL PROBLEM SOLVING.  (3 semester hours)
Prerequisites:  CS 180 with a grade of C or better.  Prerequisite or corequisite:  MATH 136.  Special requirement: Enrollment in the Gatton Academy of Mathematics and Science or Honors Program eligibility at WKU. Problem-solving tools and techniques, with an emphasis on mathematical reasoning, algorithmic techniques, and computational methods. Techniques and tools are applied to (research) areas of interest to enrolled students, in the context of a project involving program design and implementation. The course is taught jointly by mathematics and computer science faculty.  Equivalent to MATH 371.

Note:  All CS courses beyond 371 are acceptable.


Electrical Engineering

EE 210 – CIRCUITS & NETWORKS I.  (3.5 semester hours)
Prerequisite:  MATH 137 with a grade of C or better.  Prerequisite or Corequisite:  PHYS 265.
An introductory course in circuit analysis including Kirchhoffs Laws, independent and dependent sources, power and energy, lumped linear fixed networks, power factor, phasors, and three phase networks.  Laboratory included.

EE 211 – CIRCUITS & NETWORKS II.  (3.5 semester hours)
Prerequisite:  EE 210 with a grade of C or better.  Prerequisite or Corequisite:  MATH 331.
A second course in circuit analysis with an emphasis on frequency response techniques. Topics include impedance, transformed networks, Laplace transforms, resonance, two-port parameters, mutual inductance, forced and natural responses, transformers, transient response, and sinusoidal steady- state response.  Laboratory included.

Any course at the 300-level or higher (except EE 470 and EE 471) will meet the requirement. However, it is the responsibility of the student to ensure that he or she meets the prerequisites.


Engineering Mechanics

EM 221 – UK STATICS.  (3 semester hours)
Prerequisite:  MATH 136.  Prerequisite or concurrent:  MATH 137, PHYS 255.
A study of forces on bodies at rest.  Vector algebra: study of force systems, equivalent force systems, distributed forces, internal forces,principles of equilibrium, application to trusses, frames and beams and friction. This course is delivered by the University of Kentucky.

EM 222 – WKU STATICS.  (3 semester hours)
Prerequisite:  MATH 136.  Prerequisite or corequisite:  MATH 137, PHYS 255.
A study of forces on bodies at rest.  Vector algebra, study of force systems, equivalent force systems, distributed forces, internal forces, principles of equilibrium, application to trusses, frames, and beans and friction. Course delivered by Western Kentucky University.

EM 302 – UK MECHANICS OF DEFORMABLE SOLIDS.  (3 semester hours)
Prerequisites:  EM 222 with a grade of C or better, MATH 137.
A study of fundamental principles and physical laws governing the response of mechanical components to external forces. Concepts of stress, equivalent systems, rigid body equilibrium, stress strain and deformation, torsion, internal forces and bending moments, shear and bending moment diagrams, flexural loading, Mohr’s circle and pressure vessels are presented.

EM 303 – WKU MECHANICS OF DEFORMABLE SOLIDS.  (3 semester hours)
Prerequisites:  MATH 137 and 221 with a grade of “C” or better.
Study of fundamental principles and physical laws governing the response of mechanical components to external forces. Concepts of stress, equivalent systems, rigid body equilibrium, stressstrain and deformation, torsion, internal forces and bending moments, shear andbending moment diagrams, flexural loading, Mohr’s circle and pressure vessels are presented. This course is delivered by Western Kentucky University.

EM 313 – DYNAMICS.  (3 semester hours)
Prerequisite:  EM 221.  Prerequisite or concurrent:  MATH 331.
Study of the motion of bodies.  Kinematics: Cartesian and polar coordinate systems, normal and tangential components, translating and rotating reference frames. Kinetics of particles and rigid bodies, laws of motion, work and energy, impulse and momentum.

Geography

GEOG 310 – GLOBAL HYDROLOGY.  (3 semester hours)
Prerequisite:  GEOG 100, or GEOL 102, or GEOL 111.
Emphasis is given to descriptive and quantitative hydrology. The hydrologic cycle, precipitation, evaporation, and tran- spiration will be covered under descriptive hydrology.  Hydrographs, runoff relations, ground water, and storage routing will be covered under quantitative hydrology.  Consideration will be given to use and management of water as a resource.  Equivalent to GEOL 310.

GEOG 424 – WEATHER ANALYSIS AND FORECASTING.  (3 semester hours)
Prerequisite:  GEOG 121 or permission of instructor.
Analysis of the atmosphere using satellite and radar imagery. Weather forecasting techniques using surface and upper air data are also examined.

GEOG 431 – DYNAMIC METEOROLOGY I.  (3 semester hours)
Prerequisites:  GEOG 424 and MATH 237 and PHYS 265 or permission of instructor.
Introduction to large-scale dynamics of the Earths troposphere focusing on fundamental topics, the basic governing equations of motion in the atmosphere, and dry thermodynamics.

GEOG 432 – SYNOPTIC METEOROLOGY.  (3 semester hours)
Prerequisites:  GEOG 424, and MATH 237, and PHYS 265 or permission of instructor.
Addresses the analysis and prediction of large-scale weather systems, such as extra-tropical cyclones, fronts and jet streams through the application of fundamental dynamical concepts of meteorology.  Course Fee

GEOG 433 – DYNAMIC METEOROLOGY II .  (3 semester hours)
Prerequisite:  GEOG 431.
Analysis of phenomena related to large scale dynamics of the Earths troposphere including thermodynamics, elementary applications of the basic equations, and circulation and vorticity.

GEOG 437 – MESOSCALE METEOROLOGY.  (3 semester hours)
Prerequisites:  GEOG 424 and MATH 237, and PHYS 265, or permission of instructor.
Addresses the analysis and prediction of convective and Mesoscale phenomena, such as Mesoscale convective systems, severe thunderstorms, tornadoes and hurricanes.  Course Fee

GEOG 438 – PHYSICAL METEOROLOGY.  (3 semester hours)
Prerequisites:  GEOG 424, and MATH 237, and PHYS 265 or permission of instructor.
Addresses the microscopic processes related to cloud formation, radiative transfer, precipitation processes, and dry and moist thermodynamics.

Geographic Techniques

GEOG 203 – CARTOGRAPHIC ORIENTEERING.  (1 semester hour)
Use of maps, G.I.S., G.P.S., globes, protractors, rulers, and compasses to perform physical and cultural orienteering with spatially distributed data.  Students who complete GEOG 203 may not enroll in GEOL 203.  Equivalent to GEOL 203.

GEOG 316 – FUNDAMENTALS OF GEOGRAPHIC INFORMATION SYS- TEMS.  (4 semester hours)
Prerequisites:  GEOG 100 or GEOL 111, and GEOG 101 or GEOG 110, or permission of the instructor.
Fundamentals of GIS data management and cartographic design. Topics include data organization, map projections, scale, and accuracy.  Hands-on work in geospatial data acquisition, base map development, and map production. Course Fee

GEOG 317 – GEOGRAPHIC INFORMATION SYSTEMS.  (3 semester hours)
Prerequisites:  GEOG 316 with a grade of C or better, or permission of instructor.
Basic concepts of spatial science; introduction to data management, display, and analysis using geographic information systems.   Course Fee

GEOG 318 – GEOGRAPHIC INFORMATION SYSTEMS FOR ENGI- NEERS.  (3 semester hours)
Prerequisites:  MATH 137, CE 160 and CE 161; or permission of instructor.
Applications of fundamental methods of GIS, with a focus on surveying, water resources, traffic engineering, and construction.  This course does not count towards the Certificate in GIS.   Course Fee

GEOG 325 – METEOROLOGICAL INSTRUMENTATION AND MEA- SUREMENT.  (3 semester hours)
Prerequisite:  GEOG 121.
Introduces the purpose, operation, and application of meteorological instrumentation and the treatment of meteorological measurements.

GEOG 391 – DATA ANALYSIS AND INTERPRETATION.  (3 semester hours)
Prerequisites:  GEOG 100 or GEOG 102, GEOG 110, MATH 116 or higher, and MATH 183, or permission of the instructor.
Basic concept of statistical models and use of samples: variation, statistical measures, distribution, tests of significance, analysis of variance and elementary experimental design, regression, correlation, and chi-square as related to interpretation and use of scientific data.

GEOG 414 – REMOTE SENSING FUNDAMENTALS.  (4 semester hours)
Prerequisite:  GEOG 317 or permission of instructor.
Fundamentals of remote sensing theory and application including the electromagnetic spectrum, history of remote sensing, sensing platforms system limitations and applications for vegetation studies, land-use change and envi- ronmental management.  Course includes a lab component.  Course Fee

GEOG 416 – REMOTE SENSING: PRINCIPLES AND APPLICATIONS TO ENVIRONMENT AND PLANNING.  (3 semester hours)
Prerequisite:  GEOG 317 or permission of instructor.
Remote-sensing techniques and their application in the study of the biophysical environment through use of satellite imagery, including visible, infrared and radar data.

GEOG 417 – GIS ANALYSIS AND MODELING.  (3 semester hours)
Prerequisite:  GEOG 317 with a grade of C or better or instructor's permission.
Develops expertise with a broad range of spatial analysis functions applied within a cartographic modeling framework.  Course Fee

GEOG 418 – INTERNET GEOGRAPHIC INFORMATION SYSTEMS.  (3 semester hours)
Prerequisites:  CS 146 and GEOG 417; or permission of instructor.
Understanding and utilizing different techniques for creating, analyzing and disseminating GIS data and services via the internet.  Course Fee

GEOG 443 – GEOGRAPHIC INFORMATION SYSTEMS DATABASES.  (3 semester hours)
Prerequisites:  CS 146 and GEOG 417 or permission of instructor.
An introduction to the concepts and principles of GIS database planning, design, implementation, and administration. Focuses on state-of-the-art GIS database software and spatial database engine software used in conjunction with relational database management systems.  Course Fee

GEOG 492 – ADVANCED SPATIAL ANALYSIS.  (3 semester hours)
Prerequisites:  GEOG 300, GEOG 391, and GEOG 417.
History and philosophy of spatial analysis. Applications of advanced spatial analytical techniques in an interactive GIS-based environment.  Equivalent to GEOL 492.

Geology

GEOL 203 – CARTOGRAPHIC ORIENTEERING.  (1 semester hour)
Use of maps, G.I.S., G.P.S., globes, protractors, rulers, and compasses to perform physical and cultural orienteering with spatially distributed data.  Students who complete GEOL 203 may not enroll in GEOG 203.  No credit for the major or minor.  Equivalent to GEOG 203.

GEOL 270 – ANALYTICAL TECHNIQUES IN GEOLOGY.  (3 semester hours)
Prerequisites:  GEOL 111 and 112 or permission of instructor.
Basic analytical techniques used to examine and analyze Earth materials. Topics include precision and accuracy, sample preparation, contamination, calibration techniques, analysis of data sets.  Course Fee

GEOL 295 – INTRODUCTION TO RESEARCH METHODOLOGY.  (1 semester hour)
Prerequisite:  Ogden Research Scholar, or 3.2 grade point average at the end of freshman year, or OCSTH faculty member recommendation.
To familiarize Ogden Research Scholars and other research oriented students with the fundamentals of choosing a research topic, performing a bibliographical search on a subject, classification of instruments, data taking, data reduction, professional ethics and other research oriented topics. The common points of research methodology in the different scientific areas will be accentuated. Examples will be drawn from the various disciplines. Use of computers will be emphasized. (Course does not count towards any major or minor.)  Equivalent to BIOL 295, CHEM 295, CS 295, MATH 295, and PHYS 295.

GEOL 308 – STRUCTURAL GEOLOGY.  (4 semester hours)
Prerequisites:  GEOL 111 and 113, and MATH 116 or higher.
This course introduces the mechanics, characteristics, oc- currences, and resultant structures associated with the major processes of deformation of the earths crust.  Major structural regions of North America are discussed.  The laboratory emphasizes graphical and mathematical solutions of structural problems.  Field trip required.  Course Fee

GEOL 310 – GLOBAL HYDROLOGY.  (3 semester hours)
Prerequisite:  GEOG 100, or GEOL 102, or GEOL 111.
Emphasis is given to descriptive and quantitative hydrology. The hydrologic cycle, precipitation, evaporation, and tran- spiration will be covered under descriptive hydrology. Hydrographs, runoff relations, ground water, and storage routing will be covered under quantitative hydrology. Con- sideration is given to use and management of water as a resource.  Equivalent to GEOG 310.

GEOL 311 – GENERAL OCEANOGRAPHY.  (3 semester hours)
Prerequisites:  GEOL 102 or 111 or permission of the instructor.
A course in basic fundamentals pertaining to the geological, chemical, physical and biological aspects of the marine environment. Topics for discussion include the topography, structure and history of the ocean basins and their margins, ocean waters and oceanic circulation, tides and waves, marine geochemistry, ocean sediments and sedimentation, near-shore geologic processes and the ocean as a biogeochemical system. The resources of the ocean and the influence of humans are also considered.

GEOL 325 – INTRODUCTION TO MINERALS AND ROCKS.  (3 semester hours)
Prerequisite:  GEOL 102 or GEOL 111.
The sight identification of minerals and rocks is stressed. The description, origin and classification, economic uses, and occurrences of the major mineral and rock groups are discussed. Appropriate rock and minerals specimens are examined in the laboratory.

GEOL 330 – MINERALOGY.  (4 semester hours)
Prerequisites:  GEOL 111 and 113 and one semester of college chemistry or permission of the instructor.
The systematic study of minerals. Includes crystallography, crystal chemistry, mineral stability, the classification of minerals, and the origin, characteristics ad occurrences of the major mineral groups. Laboratory work includes crystal symmetry, mineral identification, and an introduction to the optical microscope. A field trip may be required.  Course Fee

GEOL 370 – PRINCIPLES OF STRATIGRAPHY.  (4 semester hours)   (Currently suspended)
Prerequisites:  GEOL 111, 112, 113 and 114.
Description, classification, and correlation of sedimentary rocks. Topics include hand-sample petrography, surface and subsurface analysis techniques, spatial and temporal relations of rock units, biostratigraphy, chronostratigraphy, and cycles and sequences in the stratigraphic record.  Associated laboratory work includes field trips.

GEOL 430 – OPTICAL MINERALOGY.  (3 semester hours)
Prerequisite:  GEOL 330.
A study of the optical constants and phenomena exhibited by and characteristic of crystalline mineral materials. Topics covered include the behavior of light in crystalline solids, the origin and nature of interference colors, refractive index, birefringence, optical character, and optical identification of minerals. Laboratory work concerns techniques employed with the petrographic microscope and the use of the microscope in mineral identification.

GEOL 432 – CRYSTALLOGRAPHY.  (4 semester hours)
Prerequisite:  GEOL 330 or PHYS 266 or CHEM 222.
An introduction to the theory and experimental practices of mod- ern crystallography. Focuses on the study of symmetry and crystal structures and their physical and chemical properties in environmentally important Earth materials.  Laboratory fee required.

GEOL 440 – HYDROGEOLOGY.  (3 semester hours)
Prerequisite:  GEOG 310 or GEOL 310.  Prerequisite or corequisite: MATH 136.
Origin, occurrence, and movement of ground water; water wells and aquifer evaluations; exploratory investigations; quality of ground water supplies; legal aspects.

GEOL 465 – GEOPHYSICS.  (3 semester hours)
Prerequisites:  GEOL 111 and one year of college physics or permission of instructor.
The fundamentals of general and exploration geo- physics. Topics include the origin of the earth and solar system, the earths interior, geochronology, gravity and isostasy, seismology, the earths heat, geomagnetism, upper atmosphere, continents and ocean basins, ridges and island arcs, and plate tectonics. The theory and applications of exploration geophysics are also covered, especially gravity, magnetic, and seismic methods.


Gerontology

HCA 383 – STATISTICAL APPLICATIONS IN HEALTHCARE.  (1 semester hour)
Prerequisite:  Permission of instructor.
This course covers statistical applications in both MS Excel and SPSS.  Basic familiarity with personal computers is assumed.

HCA 440 – HEALTH ECONOMICS.  (3 semester hours)
Prerequisites:  HCA 340, 344, 345 or 346, and ECON 202.
Examines the characteristics of the markets for medical services with emphasis on medical costs, competition, health cost inflation, health insurance, medical service markets, regulation, and economic strategies for health care managers.  This course includes financing and cost-control in foreign health systems.


Mathematics

All MATH courses that count toward the 728 major, that have not already been used to fufill the other 728 major requirements, are acceptable.  These include:

MATH 305INTRODUCTION TO MATHEMATICAL MODELING.  (3 semester hours)
Prerequisite:  MATH 137 with a grade of C or better.
Theory and computer implementation of mathematical models.  Deterministic, stochastic, discrete, continuous, and matrix models. Introduction to advanced topics such as linear algebra, differential and difference equations, probability, stochastic processes, and dynamical systems. 

MATH 315 – THEORY OF NUMBERS.  (3 semester hours)
Prerequisite:  MATH 307 with a grade of C or better.
A study of the arithmetic of the integers, divisibility, prime numbers, factorization, diophantine equations, congruences, quadratic residues.

MATH 323 – GEOMETRY I.  (3 semester hours)
Prerequisite:  MATH 307 with a grade of C or better.
Beginning with a re-examination of elementary Euclidean geometry, the course includes a study of absolute plane geometry and the parallel postulate, which leads to an axiomatic treatment of hyperbolic geometry and related topics.

MATH 331 –  DIFFERENTIAL EQUATIONS.  (3 semester hours)
Prerequisite: MATH 137 with a grade of C or better.
Methods of solution of differential equations, existence and nature of solutions, sapplications, and numerical solutions. 

MATH 370 – APPLIED TECHNIQUES IN MATHEMATICS.  (3 semester hours)
Prerequisites:  MATH 237, MATH 331 with grades of C or higher.
Matrices, systems of ordinary differential equations, complex variables, and at least one of the topics from Fourier analysis, numerical analysis, or optimization (linear programming, Lagrange multipliers).

MATH 382 – PROBABILITY AND STATISTICS I.  (3 semester hours)
Prerequisite:  MATH 310 with a grade of C or better.  Prerequisite or corequisite:  MATH 237.
Axioms and laws of probability; discrete and continuous probability distributions; multivariate distributions; random variables; expectation; moment generating functions; Central Limit Theorem. 

MATH 398 – SEMINAR MATHEMATICS.  (1 semester hour; may be repeated for up to a total of 3 hours credit.)
Prerequisite:  MATH 237 with a grade of C or better.
Students will work on a topic of interest under the direction of a mathematics faculty member who will set the requirements for the course.  Mathematics majors could have the opportunity to continue this work in MATH 498.

MATH 405 – NUMERICAL ANALYSIS I.  (3 semester hours)
Prerequisites:  MATH 237 or 307 or 310, and CS 180 or CS 146, all with grades of C or better.
Computer arithmetic, roots of equations, polynomial approximation and interpolation, numerical differentiation and integration.  Computer solutions of problems will be required.

MATH 406 – NUMERICAL ANALYSIS II.  (3 semester hours)
Prerequisites:  MATH 237, 307, 331, and either MATH 405 or CS 405, all with grades of C or better.
The solution of linear systems by direct and iterative methods, matrix inversion, the calculation of eigenvalues and eigenvectors of matrices.  Initial and boundary value problems in ordinary differential equations.  Computer solution of problems will be required.

MATH 415 – ALGEBRA AND NUMBER THEORY.   (3 semester hours)
Prerequisite:  MATH 315 or 317 with a grade of C or better.
An integrated survey of modern algebra and number theory.  Topics include number systems,theory. 

MATH 417 – ALGEBRAIC SYSTEMS.  (3 semester hours)
Prerequisite:  MATH 317 with a grade of C or better.
Theory of groups.

MATH 423 – GEOMETRY II.  (3 semester hours)
Prerequisite:  MATH 323 with a grade of C or better, or permission of instructor.
An axiomatic development of hyperbolic geometry based on the hyperbolic parallel postulate and the absolute geometry developed in MATH 323, including an emphasis on contrasts with Euclidean geometry. 

MATH 431 – INTERMEDIATE ANALYSIS.  (3 semester hours)
Prerequisite:  MATH 337 with a grade of C or better.
Topics in analysis chosen from inverse and implicit function theorems, differentiation, integration, infinite series, series of functions, and introductory functional analysis.

MATH 432 – INTRODUCTION TO MEASURE THEORY.  (3 semester hours)
Prerequisite:  MATH 431 with a grade of C or better.
Algebra of sets, axiom of choice, axioms for the real numbers, continuous functions, Borel sets, Lebesgue measure, Lebesgue integral. 

MATH 435 – PARTIAL DIFFERENTIAL EQUATIONS.  (3 semester hours)
Prerequisites:  MATH 237, 307, and 331, all with grades of C or better.
Equations of first and second order; elliptic, hyperbolic and parabolic equations; Sturm-Liouville theory; applications to equations of mathematical physics using separation of variables and Fourier series.

MATH 439 – TOPOLOGY I.  (3 semester hours)
Prerequisite:  MATH 317 with a grade of C or better, or permission of instructor.
Introduction to topology including topics selected from: topological spaces, mappings, homeomorphisms, metric spaces, surfaces, knots, manifolds, separation properties, compactness and connectedness.

MATH 450 – COMPLEX VARIABLES.   (3 semester hours)
Prerequisite:  MATH 237 with grade of C or better.
Complex number plane, analytic functions of a complex variable, integration, power series, calculus of residues, conformal representation, applications of analytic function theory.

MATH 470 – INTRODUCTION TO OPERATIONS RESEARCH.  (3 semester hours)
Prerequisites:  MATH 237 and 307 with grades of C or better.
Principles and techniques of operations research including linear programming, integer programming, quality theory, sensitivity analysis, and dynamic programming.

MATH 473 – INTRODUCTION TO GRAPH THEORY.  (3 semester hours)
Prerequisites:  MATH 307 and MATH 310 with grades of C or better, or permission of instructor.
Fundamental concepts, key ideas and tools in graph theory, with an emphasis on proof methods, algorithms and applications.  Techniques and tools are applied to practical optimization problems and other areas of mathematics and computer science.  This course is equivalent to CS 473.

MATH 475 – SELECTED TOPICS IN MATHEMATICS.  (1-3 semester hours)
Prerequisite:  Permission of instructor.
A consideration of special topics to acquaint the advanced undergraduate student with significant problems and developments of current interest in mathematics.  Topics may vary each semester offered.

MATH 482 – PROBABILITY AND STATISTICS II.  (3 semester hours)
Prerequisites:  MATH 237 and MATH 382 with grades of C or better.
Multivariate probability distributions; sampling distributions, statistical inference; point and interval estimation, properties of estimators; hypothesis testing; regression and correlation; analysis of variance; non-parametric methods.


Mechanical Engineering

ME 180 – FRESHMAN DESIGN II.  (3 semester hours)
Prerequisites:  ME 175 or 176, or permission of instructor, and MATH 136 with a grade of “C” or better.
A continuation of the engineering design process, with an emphasis on electromechanical design and the use of professional engineering tools. Virtual and rapid prototypes will be developed through a series of integrated projects. Basic concepts in engineering experimentation will be introduced. Requires a grade of “C” or better in MATH 136. Course Fee

ME 200 – SOPHOMORE DESIGN.  (3 semester hours)
Prerequisites:  ME 180 with a grade of “C” or better, EM 221.
Enhances design abilities through individual and team design projects, develops structured problem-solving techniques and written, oral and graphical communication skills.

ME 220 – ENGINEERING THERMODYNAMICS I.  (3 semester hours)
Prerequisites:  MATH 237, ME 200.  Prerequisite or concurrent:  MATH 331.
Fundamental principles of thermodynamics, first law, physical properties, ideal and real gases, second law, reversibility and irreversibility, and consequences of thermodynamic cycles.

ME 240 – MATERIALS AND METHODS OF MANUFACTURING.  (3 semester hours)
Prerequisites:  MATH 136 with a grade of C or better, CHEM 116 or 120.  Corequisite:  ME 241.
Introduction to the science of engineering materials including structures from the atomic to macroscopic scales, properties, strengthening mechanisms, phase diagrams and correlation between processing and properties. Introduction to manufacturing process selection and properties of materials.

ME 241 – MATERIALS and METHODS OF MANUFACTURING LAB.  (1 semester hour)
Prerequisites:  MATH 136 with a grade of C or better; CHEM 116 or 120.  Corequisite:  ME 240.
Laboratory supporting ME 240. Experiments to develop understanding of materials science, engineering material properties and relationships between processing and properties. Exposure to manufacturing methods through experimentation and observation, including field trips to regional sites.

ME 285 – ELEMENTS OF INDUSTRIAL AUTOMATION.  (1 semester hour)
Prerequisite:  ME 180 with a “C” or better.
An introduction to PLC controls of industrial automation equipment, with emphasis on their impact on electromechanical design and safety.  Elements of industrial networking will be introduced.  Course Fee

ME 300 – JUNIOR DESIGN.  (2 semester hours)
Prerequisites:  ME 200, ME 344.  Students must have satisfied the Mechanical Engineering Pre-Major requirements as shown in the iCAP system.  Prerequisite or corequisite:  ME 310.
Introduces the concept of design methodologies: Design for Assembly, Design for Manufacturing, etc. and applies these techniques to design projects. Written, oral, and graphical communication skills will continue to be developed, including skills in working with vendors for production of components to engineering specifications.

ME 310 – ENGINEERING INSTRUMENTATION AND EXPERIMENTATION.  (3 semester hours)
Prerequisites:  ME 285, EM 303.  Prerequisite or corequisite:  ME 347.
The use of sensors and instruments to measure the behavior of mechanical systems is explored in lectures and laboratory exercises. Application of sensors, calibration of systems, and methods of data collection and analysis are covered with an emphasis on uncertainty analysis.  Course Fee

ME 321 – ENGINEERING THERMODYNAMICS II.  (3 semester hours)
Prerequisites:  ME 220, MATH 331.
Gas mixtures, air-water vapor mixtures. Air conditioning system design. Principles and design of energy conversion devices, power and refrigeration cycles. Principles of combustion, chemical equilibrium, onedimensional gas dynamics.  Nozzle design.  Continuation of ME 220.

ME 325 – ELEMENTS OF HEAT TRANSFER.  (3 semester hours)
Prerequisite:  ME 330.
Discussion of basic physical laws of heat transfer Including steady-state and transient heat flow, one, two, and three dimensional heat conduction in solids, free or forced convection in fluids, radiation and phase change. Analysis of heat exchangers.

ME 330 – FLUID MECHANICS.  (3 semester hours) 
Prerequisite:  ME 220.  Prerequisite or corequisite:  MATH 331.
An introduction to the physical laws governing the mechanical behavior of liquids and gasses, with applications of conservation o mass, energy and momentum equations. Topics include fluid statics, internal and external fluid flow, flow measurement, scale modeling and similitude, hydraulic machinery analysis and pipe networks.

ME 344 – MECHANICAL DESIGN.  (3 semester hours)
Prerequisite:  EM 303.  Prerequisite or corequisite:  ME 240.
Fundamentals of design with methods of approximation. Introduction to optimum design considerations. Synthesis and problems on the design of various mechanical elements.

ME 347 – MECHANICAL SYSTEMS LABORATORY.  (1 semester hour)
Prerequisite:  ME 241.  Prerequisites or corequisites:  EM 303, MATH 331.
Implementation of fundamental principles and physical laws governing the response of mechanical system components to external forces and constraints. Students will learn to plan, conduct, and report on a variety of experiments and projects to measure the performance characteristics of mechanical systems.

ME 365 – THERMAL SCIENCES FOR ELECTRICAL ENGINEERS. (3 semester hours)
Prerequisite:  PHYS 265 or MATH 331 (prerequisite or concurrent).
Theoretical background and analysis methods required to predict the thermal behavior of electronic components and systems. Topics include design and analysis methods of forced and buoyancy-driven systems, as well as conduction, natural and forced convection, and radiation heat transfer.  (This course is not for Mechanical Engineering majors).

ME 366 – MECHANICS FOR ELECTRICAL ENGINEERS. (3 semester hours)
Prerequisite:  PHYS 255.  Prerequisite or corequisite:  MATH 237.
A combined course in statics and dynamics. Topics from statics include vector algebra, distributed and internal forces, trusses, frames, and beams. Topics from dynamics include kinematics/kinetics in various reference systems, work/energy, and impulse/momentum.  (This course is not for civil or mechanical engineering majors.)

ME 400 – MECHANICAL ENGINEERING DESIGN.  (2 semester hours)
Prerequisite: ME 300.  A formal introduction to product development methodologies and project management techniques, building upon experiences in previous design courses. Students will perform team design projects as well as complete the design specifications for their senior capstone project.

ME 412 – MECHANICAL ENGINEERING SENIOR PROJECT.  (3 semester hours)
Prerequisites:  ME 325, 400.
Students work in design teams to develop a robust solution to a complex system design problem. Focus will be on design-build-test of the proposed solution. Students expected to demonstrate all aspects of professional engineering practice.

ME 416 – UK-DYNAMIC SYSTEMS ELECTIVE.  (3 semester hours)
Prerequisites:  EM 313 and MATH 331.
Advanced special topics delivered in the program by UK faculty to acquaint the undergraduate student with significant problems and developments of current interest in the dynamic systems area of mechanical engineering.  Course Fee

ME 440 – THERMAL FLUID SYSTEMS LABORATORY.  (2 semester hours)
Prerequisite:  ME 310 with a grade of “C” or better.  Corequisite:  ME 325.
Applied laboratory in modeling, prediction, and measurement of thermal-fluid systems. Emphasis on preparation of engineering reports, uncertainty analysis, and experimental design plan process. System level experiments will include fluid property measurements, pipe flow and turbomachinery characteristics, heat transfer measurements, and various thermodynamic cycles.

ME 445 – DYNAMIC SYSTEMS LABORATORY.  (2 semester hours)
Prerequisite:  ME 310 with a grade of “C” or better.  Corequisite:  ME 416.
Applied laboratory in modeling, prediction, and measurement of the response of mechanical dynamic systems, including free and forced responses.  Emphasis on experimental planning and documentation of results.  Course Fee

Physics

PHYS 201 – COLLEGE PHYSICS I.  (4 semester hours)
Prerequisites:  High School algebra,geometry and right triangle trigonometry.
An introductory course for students majoring in the applied sciences, emphasizing the application of basic physics principles through problem solving. Topics covered include mechanics, heat and thermodynamics, properties of matter and waves. Includes both lecture and laboratory components.  (No calculus is used).  GEN ED D-I | NS | SL

Note:  The above course does not count toward both GEN ED and 728 supporting course requirements.

PHYS 202 – COLLEGE PHYSICS II.  (4 semester hours)
Prerequisite:  PHYS 201.  Corequisite:  PHYS 208 
(Course and laboratory must be taken together or dropped together.)
A continuation of PHYS 201. The following topics are covered: electrostatics, electric field strength, electric potential difference, resistance, capacitance, DC circuits, magnetism, electromagnetic induction, electromechanical devices, simple AC circuits, reflection, refraction, geometrical optics, physical optics, interference and diffraction. Includes both lecture and laboratory components. (No calculus is used).

PHYS 227 – ENGINEERING STATICS.  (3 semester hours)
Corequisite:  MATH 237.
Study of external forces acting on particles and rigid bodies in equilibrium including force systems in two and three dimensions, distributed loading, applications to trusses, beams, frames and cables using vector algebra. Also covers centroids and moments of inertia.  Equivalent to MET 227.

PHYS 231 – INTRODUCTION TO PHYSICS AND BIOPHYSICS I.  (3 semester hours)
Prerequisites:  High school algebra and geometry.  Corequisite:  PHYS 232
(Course and laboratory must be taken together or dropped together.)
The first half of a basic course for students of the life sciences, covering the topics of mechanics, heat and thermodynamics, properties of matter, waves and sound. Emphasis is on an understanding of the physical principles operative in biological systems and on the application of physical methods in biology and medicine.
GEN ED D-I | NS

Note: The above course does not count toward both GEN ED and 728 supporting course requirements.

PHYS 232 – LABORATORY FOR PHYSICS AND BIOPHYSICS I.  (1 semester hour)
Corequisite:  PHYS 231.  Required for students enrolled in 231.
Students perform physics experiments on mechanics, fluids, sound, heat and thermodynamics.  Course Fee
GEN ED D-I (DL) | SL

Note: The above course does not count toward both GEN ED and 728 supporting course requirements.

PHYS 233 – LABORATORY FOR PHYSICS AND BIOPHYSICS II.  (1 semester hour)
Corequisite:  PHYS 332.
Required for students enrolled in 332. Students perform physics experiments in electricity, magnetism and optics. Course Fee

PHYS 255 – UNIVERSITY PHYSICS I.  (4 semester hours)
Prerequisite:  MATH 136 with a grade of C or better.  Corequisites:  MATH 137 and PHYS 256.
This is the first half of a yearlong course in calculus-based physics suggested for students in the physical sciences and mathematics. Definitions, concepts, and problem solving will be emphasized. Topics include kinematics, dynamics, energy, conservation laws, rotation, harmonic motion, mechanical waves and thermodynamics.   GEN ED D-I | NS

Note: The above course can count toward both GEN ED and 728 supporting course requirements.

PHYS 256 – UNIVERSITY PHYSICS I LAB.  (1 semester hour)
Corequisite:  PHYS 255.  Required for students enrolled in PHYS 255.
Students perform physics experiments in mechanics and thermodynamics which stress the fundamental definitions and laws developed in the lecture course. Students gain experience in computerized data acquisition and data analysis using modern techniques and equipment.  Course Fee | GEN ED D-I (DL) |  SL

Note: The above course can count toward both GEN ED and 728 supporting course requirements.

PHYS 265 – UNIVERSITY PHYSICS II.  (4 semester hours)
Prerequisites:  PHYS 255 and MATH 137, both with grades of C or better.  Corequisite:  PHYS 266.
This is the second half of a year-long course in calculus-based physics suggested for students in the physical sciences and mathematics. Definitions, concepts, and problem solving will be emphasized. Topics include electricity and magnetism, (electrical and magnetic fields, forces, energy, potential, charged particle motion, induction, and circuits), sound waves and optics.

PHYS 266 – UNIVERSITY PHYSICS II LABORATORY.  (1 semester hour)
Prerequisites:  PHYS 255 and MATH 137.  Corequisite:  PHYS 265.
Required for students enrolled in PHYS 265. Students perform physics experiments in electricity and magnetism, waves and optics which stress the fundamental definitions and laws developed in the lecture course. Students gain experience in computerized data acquisition and data analysis using modern techniques and equipment. Course Fee

PHYS 270 – UNIVERSITY PHYSICS III.  (3 semester hours)
Prerequisites:  MATH 136 or equivalent.  Co-requisites:  PHYS 271 and MATH 137 or equivalent
(Course and laboratory must be taken together or dropped together.)
This is the third course in the general physics sequence (250-260-270) suggested for students in the physical sciences and mathematics. Topics include fluids (hydrostatics and hydrodynamics), thermodynamics, vibrations, wave motion, sound, physical optics (interference, diffraction and polarization), and geometrical optics (reflection, refraction, and image formation).

PHYS 271 – LABORATORY FOR UNIVERSITY PHYSICS III.  (1 semester hour)
Co-requisites:  PHYS 270 and MATH 137 or equivalent.  Required for students enrolled in PHYS 270.
Students perform physics experiments on elasticity, mechanics of fluids, heat, thermodynamics, ideal gases, simple harmonic motion, sound and optics. Students gain experience in computerized data acquisition and data analysis using modern techniques and equipment.

PHYS 275 – ASTRONOMY RESEARCH METHODS.  (3 semester hours)
Prerequisites:  MATH 117 or equivalent; and permission of department.
Intensive project-based course to introduce students to the fundamentals of astronomy using scientific research investigations as examples.  Includes familiarization with astronomical instrumentation for imaging and spectroscopy of celestial objects, digital image reduction and analysis, and interpretation of results.  Additional topics include the process and nature of scientific research and professional ethics.  This course does not count toward a major or minor in physics or astronomy.

PHYS 295 – INTRODUCTION TO RESEARCH METHODOLOGY.  (1 semester hour)
Prerequisite:  Ogden Research Scholar, or 3.2 grade point average at the end of freshman year, or OCSTH faculty member recommendation.
To familiarize Ogden Research Scholars and other research oriented students with the fundamentals of choosing a research topic, performing a bibliographical search on a subject, topic, classification of instruments, data taking, data reduction, professional ethics and other research oriented topics.  The common points of research methodology in the different scientific areas will be accentuated. Examples will be drawn from the various disciplines. Use of computers will be emphasized. (Course does not count towards any major or minor.)  Equivalent to BIOL 295, CHEM 295, CS 295, GEOL 295, and MATH 295.

PHYS 332 – INTRODUCTION TO PHYSICS AND BIOPHYSICS II.  (3 semester hours)
Prerequisite: PHYS 231. Co-requisite: PHYS 233 (Course and laboratory must be taken together or dropped together.)
The second half of a basic course for students of the life sciences, covering the topics of electricity, magnetism, light optics, atomic and nuclear physics. Emphasis is on an understanding of the physical principles operative in biological systems and on the application of physical methods in biology and medicine.

PHYS 301 – ELECTRICAL MEASUREMENTS LABORATORY.  (1 semester hour)
Prerequisites:  PHYS 265 and 266.
Laboratory experiments in fundamental techniques of electrical measurements.

PHYS 302 – ATOMIC PHYSICS LABORATORY.  (1 semester hour)
Prerequisite:  PHYS 321.
Fundamental experiments of historical importance in modern physics.

PHYS 303 – ELECTRONICS LABORATORY.  (1 semester hour)
Corequisite:  PHYS 340.  Required for students enrolled in PHYS 340.
Laboratory experiments in basic techniques of analog and digital electronics.

PHYS 316 – COMPUTATIONAL PHYSICS.  (3 semester hours)
Prerequisite:  PHYS 265 or permission of the instructor.
Use of computers to solve physics problems, model physical systems, and analyze data. Topics include: realistic motion, data analysis, Fourier transform, solutions to Laplace’s equation, and Monte Carlo methods.

PHYS 318 – DATA ACQUISITION USING LABVIEW.  (3 semester hours)
Prerequisite:  PHYS 265 or permission of instructor.
A study of computer-assisted measurement and automation techniques. Students receive hands-on experience in measuring and controlling physical phenomena through laboratory exercises and projects. Recognized as a LabVIEW Academy course by National Instruments. Offers students the opportunity to become certified LabVIEW associate developers.

PHYS 320 – INTRODUCTORY MODERN PHYSICS I.  (3 semester hours)
Prerequisites:  PHYS 270 or equivalent; MATH 136 or equivalent.  Corequisite:  MATH 137.
An introductory study of the breakdown of classical physics at the atomic level (quantization) and at high speeds (relativity).  Emphasis is placed upon observable effects of the interaction between matter and radiation and the new theories created to explain these effects. The topics include elements of special relativity; particle-like behavior of radiation; wave-like behavior of particles; the hydrogen spectrum and the Bohr theory; elements of quantum mechanics; magnetic properties of atoms and electron spin; the periodic table; spectra of hydrogen-like atoms; and other selected topics of modern physics.

PHYS 321 – INTRODUCTORY MODERN PHYSICS II.  (3 semester hours)
Prerequisites:  PHYS 180 and 265.
A study of the quantization phenomena describing the many electron atoms; statistical distribution laws, conductivity, superconductivity and band theory of solids; nuclear structure, nuclear reactions and other selected topics of modern physics.

PHYS 330 – THERMODYNAMICS.  (3 semester hours)
Prerequisites:  PHYS 321, MATH 237 and 331.
A study of thermodynamic systems, equations of state, entropy, Maxwell-Bolzmann and quantum statistics.

PHYS 335 – GENERAL BIOPHYSICS.  (4 semester hours)  (3 hour LECTURE; 1 hour LAB)
Prerequisites:  PHYS 231, 332; BIOL 120/121; or permission of instructor.
An introduction to the major fields of biophysics in quantitative terms, with emphasis on the physical techniques applied in biomedical practice and research.

PHYS 337 – MEDICAL IMAGING.  (4 semester hours)
Prerequisites:  BIOL 120, MATH 136, and PHYS 332 or PHYS 256.
An introduction to the fundamental and quantitative principles underlying major medical imaging techniques.

PHYS 340 – CIRCUIT THEORY AND ELECTRONICS.  (3 semester hours)
Prerequisites:  PHYS 265, 301; MATH 137.  Corequisite:  PHYS 303.
This course is suitable for all science majors who will use electronic devices in their work. It is a study of circuit analysis, active devices (such as diodes, transistors, silicon controlled rectifiers) and integrated circuits. Particular emphasis is placed on design and use of simple power supplies, transistor circuits, and operational amplifier circuits.

PHYS 350 – CLASSICAL MECHANICS I.  (3 semester hours)
Prerequisites:  PHYS 265.  Prerequisites or Corequisites:  MATH 331 and MATH 237.
A study of classical mechanics including equations of motion, coordinate systems, the simple harmonic oscillator, damping forces, vector algebra, momentum and energy theorems.

PHYS 389 – PRACTICUM IN PHYSICS AND ASTRONOMY.  (3-6 semester hours)
Practical experience in a supervised work situation.  Application of basic knowledge and skills from the student’s major discipline or area of career interest, with opportunities in learning the social, psychological, cultural and communication aspects of work.  The student is placed under the direction of a supervisor of a cooperating business, industry, agency or institution.  Includes specific, learning objectives and evaluation of the student using one or more of the following formats: (1) written reports, (2) seminar presentations, or (3) tests over selected readings.  May be repeated with departmental approval.

PHYS 399 – RESEARCH PROBLEMS IN PHYSICS AND ASTRONOMY.  (1-3 semester hours)
Prerequisite:  PHYS 321.
Assigned reading or research for qualified undergraduates. May be repeated with change of content, but only three hours will count toward a major.

PHYS 404 – OPTICS LABORATORY.  (1 semester hour)
Corequisite:  PHYS 441.
Required laboratory for students enrolled in PHYS 441. Fundamental laboratoryexperiments in geometrical and physical optics.

PHYS 406 – LAB/SOLID STATE.  (1 semester hour)
Corequisite:  PHYS 460.
Fundamental lab experiments in solid state physics.

PHYS 407 – NUCLEAR PHYSICS LAB.  (1 semester hour)
Corequisite:  PHYS 470.
Fundamental lab experiments in nuclear physics.

PHYS 431 – RADIATION BIOPHYSICS  (4 semester hours)  [(2) LECTURE; (2) LAB.]
Prerequisites:  PHYS 201-202 or PHYS 231-332.
A treatment of the properties of the various forms of radiation and their interaction with, and effects on, living matter. The laboratory offers training in the monitoring of ionizing radiations and in the techniques of radioactive isotopes as applied in biological and clinical work.  Equivalent to BIOL 431.

PHYS 440 – ELECTRICITY AND MAGNETISM I.  (3 semester hours)
Prerequisites:  PHYS 350 and MATH 237 and 331.
A study of classical electricity and magnetism with emphasis on fields, potentials, conductors, dielectrics, steady currents and radiation.

PHYS 441 – OPTICS. (3 semester hours)
Prerequisites:  PHYS 180 and 265 and MATH 137.  Corequisite:  PHYS 404.
A study of geometrical and physical optics including wave propagation, refraction, dispersion, diffraction and polarization.

PHYS 445 – ELECTROMAGNETISM II.  (3 semester hours)
Prerequisites:  PHYS 440.
The study of classical electrodynamics with emphasis on Maxwell’s equations, electromagnetic waves, dispersion, and radiation.

PHYS 450 – CLASSICAL MECHANICS II.  (3 semester hours)
Prerequisites:  PHYS 350 and MATH 237 and 331.
A study of rigid body motion, moving coordinate systems, Lagrange’s equations, small vibrations and the special theory of relativity as applied to mechanics.

PHYS 460 – SOLID STATE PHYSICS.  (3 semester hours)
Prerequisites:  PHYS 321, MATH 237 and 331.  Corequisite:  PHYS 406.
An introductory course in the theory of solids including geometrical and x-ray crystallography, Maxwell-Boltzmann and Fermi-Dirac statistics, free electron theory of metals, Brillouin Zones, band-model of semiconductors and the Hall Effect.

PHYS 465 – GEOPHYSICS.  (3 semester hours)
Prerequisites:  GEOL 111 and one year of college physics or permission of the instructor.
The basic fundamentals of general and exploration geophysics. The initial topics discussed include the origin of the earth and the solar system, the earth’s interior, geochronology, gravity and isostasy, seismology, the earth’s heat, geomagnetism, upper atmosphere, continents and ocean basins, ridges and island arcs, and continental drift. The theory and applications of exploration geophysics are also covered, especially gravity, magnetic and seismic methods.  Equivalent to GEOL 465.

PHYS 470 – NUCLEAR PHYSICS.  (3 semester hours)
Prerequisites:  PHYS 302, 321 and MATH 331.  Corequisite: PHYS 407.
The properties of the nucleus including radioactivity, radiation detectors, nuclear reactions, nuclear mass and size determination, alpha, beta, and gamma decay, nuclear models, particle accelerators, fission and elementary particles.

PHYS 480 – QUANTUM MECHANICS.  (3 semester hours)
Prerequisites:  PHYS 321, 350, MATH 237; and one of the following:  PHYS 440, 450 or MATH 435.
A study of the fundamental principles of quantum mechanics including the hydrogen and helium atoms, the harmonic oscillator, and the Schrödinger wave equation.

PHYS 489 – INTERNSHIP IN PHYSICS AND ASTRONOMY.  (3-6 semester hours)
(May be repeated with department approval.)
Practical experience in a supervised work situation. Application of advanced knowledge and skills from the student’s major discipline or area of career interest, with opportunities in learning the social, psychological, cultural, and communication aspects of work.  The student is placed under the direction of a supervisor of a cooperating business industry, agency or institution. Includes specific learning objectives and evaluation of student using one or more of the following formats: (1) written reports, (2) seminar presentations, or (3) tests over selected readings.

Statistics

STAT 301 – INTRODUCTORY PROBABILITY AND APPLIED STATISTICS.  (3 semester hours)
Prerequisite:  MATH 136 or MATH 142, with a grade of C or better.
A calculus-based introduction to applied statistics, with emphasis on analysis of real data.  Curve fitting, probability models, estimation and testing for means and proportions, quality control; use of computers for data analysis and simulation.

STAT 330 – INTRODUCTION TO STATISTICAL SOFTWARE.  (3 semester hours)
Prerequisite:  3 hours of undergraduate statistics with a grade of C or better, or consent of instructor. 
Using proprietary and open-source statistical software for data analysis.  Interactive techniques for data management, manipulation and transformation. Interactive techniques for data error checking, descriptive statistics, basic inferential statistics, and basic report generation such as tabular and graphical displays.  Introduction to scripts and batch processing when applicable.  Proper use and interpretation of the methods are emphasized.

STAT 401 – REGRESSION ANALYSIS.  (3 semester hours)
Prerequisite:  A grade of C or better in STAT 301 or permission of instructor.  Prerequisite or corequisite: STAT 330. 
Regression topics including simple and multiple linear regression, least squares estimates, inference, transformations, diagnostic checking, and model selection methods.  Selected special regression topics will also be introduced.  Statistical software packages will be used for analyses.

STAT 402 – EXPERIMENTAL DESIGN.  (3 semester hours)
Prerequisite:  STAT 301 with a grade of C or better or permission of instructor.  Prerequisite or corequisite: STAT 330. 
Experimental design and analysis topics including single- and multiple-factor designs, factorial and fractional factorial designs, fixed vs. random effects models, response surface, nested designs, and special topics.  Statistical software packages will be used for analyses.

 
Dr. David K. Neal, Lead Academic Advisor
Department of Mathematics
COHH 4108
Western Kentucky University
Bowling Green, KY 42101
270.745.6213